The Connoisseur’s Guide to the Scripts of the Star Wars Saga

Bjorn Wahlberg | March 31, 2010 in Bjorn Wahlberg | Comments (3)

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The Connoisseur’s Guide to the Scripts of the Star Wars Saga
Compiled & edited by Björn Wahlberg, M.A.

A George Lucas quote from Star Wars: The Annotated Screenplays, 1997, p. 319:

The way I work is that I cut the movie together, I look at it and figure out what I’m missing. At that point, it’s more about how the movie flows together rather than how the script flows together. I’m acknowledging more and more that a script and a movie are two different things.

The Scripts for STAR WARS by George Lucas

A George Lucas quote from the Star Wars Souvenir Program, May 1977:

I had the Star Wars project in mind even before I started my last picture, American Graffiti, and as soon as I finished I began writing Star Wars in January 1973 – eight hours a day, five days a week, from then until March 1976, when we began shooting. Even then I was busy doing various rewrites in the evenings after the day’s work. In fact, I wrote four entirely different screenplays for Star Wars, searching for just the right ingredients, characters and storyline. It’s always been what you might call a good idea in search of a story.

1969: While making THX-1138, George Lucas confides to composer Lalo Schifrin that he wants to make a Flash Gordon film.

Summer 1972:  While making American Graffiti, George Lucas talks about his upcoming science fiction film. According to actor Charlie Martin Smith,

It sounded great to me – a big SF adventure with these short furry creatures called Wookiees. Richard Dreyfuss and I kept begging George to let us play them. […] Then, he turned around and made the Wookiees seven feet tall, which knocked me out of the running for that part. (Starlog, #120: p.42.)

January 1973: Lucas begins to write the first original story synopsis.

SW.A.
Early 1973.
Journal of the Whills.
Original Story Outline. 40 pages. Partial, handwritten.
Source: Bouzereau: p. 3.
It begins thus: “This is the story of Mace Windu, a revered Jedi Bendu of Ophuchi who was related to Usby C.J. Thape, Padawaan learner of the famed Jedi.”

A George Lucas quote from Star Wars: The Annotated Screenplays, 1997, p.6:

Originally, I was trying to have the story be told by somebody else; there was somebody watching this whole story and recording it, somebody probably wiser than the mortal players in the actual events. I eventually dropped this idea, and the concepts behind the Whills turned into the Force. But the Whills became part of this massive amount of notes, quotes, background information that I used for the scripts; the stories were actually taken from the ‘Journal of the Whills’.

SW.B.List.1.
1973.
Handwritten list of characters. (No date)
Source: Bouzereau: p. 3.
The list includes names such as: General Luke Skywalker, See-Threepio and Artoo-Detoo (two workmen), General Vader, Han Solo, Chewbacca (a Wookiee prince), and Bail Antilles (a trader).

SW.B.List.2.
1973.
Handwritten list of planets. (No date.)
Source: Bouzereau: p. 3.
The list includes names such as: Aquilae (a desert planet), Yavin (a jungle planet), Ophuchi (a cloud planet), and Alderaan (a city planet).
Laurent Bouzereau writes, p. viii: “In compiling this information and these background details, Lucas created a reference book he called ‘Journal of the Whills’, which eventually became the starting point for the Star Wars saga.”

SW.0.
Spring 1973.
The Star Wars.

Original Story Synopsis. 13 pages. Handwritten on blue-lined paper with no. 2 pencils, according to Pollock, p. 146.
Source: Bouzereau: p. 3.

SW.0.Typed
May 25, 1973.
The Star Wars.
Original Story Synopsis. 14 pages. Typed treatment from original notes and synopsis.
Sources: Bouzereau: p. 3; Lofficier: 17-18; Pollock: pp.146-147; Flynn: pp. 7-8.

The story is highly derivative of Akira Kurosawa’s film The Hidden Fortress. In fact, Lucas even nicked entire passages from Donald Richie’s seminal book The Film of Akira Kurosawa (1st ed. 1965), which included a synopsis of The Hidden Fortress.

The earliest printed record of the story is Lucas’s words in the following article in the film magazine Chaplin, Fall 1973:

Star Wars is a mixture of Lawrence of Arabia, the James Bond films and 2001. The space aliens are the heroes, and the Homo Sapiens naturally the villains. Nobody has ever done anything like this since Flash Gordon Conquers the Universe in 1942.

A George Lucas quote from Mediascene Prevue #42, 1980:

I think [I came up with the title The Star Wars before the story]. When I made the deal, I had to give it a name. I had been making notes, doing research over the years, but it wasn’t until I finished American Graffiti in ’73 that I actually started writing it. My original 14-page treatment didn’t bear much relationship to the final production, though.

SW.1.
May 1974.
The Star Wars.
Rough Draft. [First Draft.] 132 pages. 191 scenes.
Sources: Bouzereau: p. 3; Pollock: pp. 158-159; Flynn: pp. 8-10.
A George Lucas quote from Filmmakers Newsletter, March 1974: “It [The Star Wars] is science fiction – Flash Gordon genre; 2001 meets James Bond, outer space and space ships flying in it.” SW.1.R

July 1974.
The Star Wars.
First Draft. [Revised First Draft.] 146 pages. 191 scenes. This revised draft is identical to the Rough Draft, but Lucas changed many of the names into sounding more Japanese. Sources: Bouzereau: p. 3; Flynn: p. 10.

A George Lucas quote from Film Quarterly, Spring 1974: “[The Star Wars] is a space opera in the tradition of Flash Gordon and Buck Rogers. It’s James Bond and 2001 combined – super fantasy, capes and swords and laser guns and spaceships shooting each other, and all that sort of stuff. But it’s not camp. It’s meant to be an exciting action adventure film.” SW.2.

January 28, 1975.
Adventures of The Starkiller (episode one) ‘The Star Wars’.
Second Draft. 115 pages. 138 scenes.
Sources: Lofficier: pp. 19-20; Pollock: pp. 159-160; Flynn: pp.10-11.
SW.2.

Notes
January 30, 1975.
Original Handwritten Notes.
Source: Bouzereau: p. 3. SW.2.RS

May 1, 1975.
The Adventures of Luke Starkiller (Episode One) The Star Wars.
Story Synopsis. 6 pages.
Sources: Lofficier: p. 20; Pollock: p. 162; Flynn: pp. 11-12.

Spring 1975:
George Lucas discovers the writings of Joseph Campbell, particularly The Hero with a Thousand Faces (1949), which helps him focus on the story of Luke Starkiller. (Proof: Massassi, a name of a goddess mentioned in Campbell’s book, is first included in the 3rd Draft. The name was Mavassi in the Rough Draft.

A George Lucas quote from the book The Hero’s Journey – Joseph Campbell on his Life and Works (1990): “I didn’t know what I was doing at the time [writing Star Wars]. I started working, started doing research, started writing, and a year went by. I wrote many drafts of this work and then I stumbled across The Hero With A Thousand Faces. It was the first time that I really began to focus. Once I read that book I said to myself, This is what I’ve been doing. This is it. […] It was The Hero With A Thousand Faces that just took what was about 500 pages and said, Here is the story. Here’s the end; here’s the focus; here’s the way it’s all laid out. It was all right there and had been there for thousands of years, as Dr. Campbell pointed out. And I said, This is it. […] It’s possible that if I had not run across him I would still be writing Star Wars today.” SW.3.

August 1, 1975.
The Star Wars. From The Adventures of Luke Starkiller.
Third Draft. 110 pages. 229 scenes.
Sources: Lofficier: 120 p. 20; Pollock: p. 162; Flynn: pp. 12-13. (Not in Bouzereau’s list, but mentioned in his comments.) SW.4.

January 1, 1976.
The Adventures of Luke Starkiller as taken from the “Journal of the Whills” (Saga 1) Star Wars.
Fourth Draft. 145 pages. 252 scenes. (Ben Kenobi still alive at ending; TIE Fighter attack prior to reaching Death Star.)
Sources: Bouzereau: p. 3; Pollock: p. 20.

A George Lucas quote from Rolling Stone # 246 (August 25, 1977): “In the original script [i.e. 4th Draft] Ben Kenobi doesn’t get killed in the fight with Vader. About halfway through production I took Alec aside and said I was going to kill him off halfway through the picture. […] I was struggling with the problem that I had this sort of climactic scene that had no climax about two-thirds of the way through the film. I had another problem in the fact that there was no real threat in the Death Star. The villains were like tenpins; you get into a gunfight with them and they just get knocked over. As I originally wrote it, Ben Kenobi and Vader had a sword fight and Ben hits a door and the door slams closed and they all run away and Vader is left standing there with egg on his face. This was dumb; they run into the Death Star and they sort of take over everything and they run back. It diminished any impact the Death Star had.” SW.4.Battle

January 1, 1976.
Battle.
Fourth Draft. Copy of original re-typed version with final changes and suggested scene numbers. (Subsequent versions of this script exists.)
Source: Bouzereau: p. 3.
SW.4.R.

March 15, 1976.
The Adventures of Luke Starkiller as taken from “The Journal of the Whills” (Saga 1) Star Wars.
Revised Fourth Draft Screenplay. 156 pages. 252 scenes.
With circa 30 percent dialogue additions by Willard Huyck and Gloria Katz. (The actual shooting script: Ben Kenobi dies.)
Source: Bouzereau: p. 3; Pollock: p. 20; Flynn: p. 13.

A George Lucas quote from Star Wars: The Annotated Screenplays, 1997, p. 7: “Dialogue has never been my strong point, and so I talked to Willard and Gloria and asked them to do a quick dialogue polish. I gave them the fourth draft of the script, and they just improved the dialogue where they felt they could make a contribution. Then I took their changes, and sometimes I rewrote some of their lines. Some of their dialogue of course changed again when we started shooting. Some of it survived; some of it didn’t. They did about thirty percent of the dialogue.” SW.4.R2.

April 19, 1976.
The Adventures of Luke Starkiller as taken from “The Journal of the Whills” (Saga 1) Star Wars.
Revised Fourth Draft Screenplay. 156 pages. 252 scenes. (More dialogue during final battle, Luke makes two attempts at Exhaust Port.)

A George Lucas quote in Sight & Sound, Summer 1976: “Star Wars is total fantasy for today’s kids who don’t have the opportunity to grow up watching Flash Gordon and have to sit through movies of insecurity instead (like Earthquake or Towering Inferno).” SW.4.R2.

Greedo
February 5, 1977.
Greedo dialogue Add. (Greedo scene with added title cards.)
Revised Fourth Draft Screenplay. 156 pages. 252 scenes.
Published Scripts: SW.PV.

November 1979.
Star Wars, Episode IV: A New Hope, from the Journal of the Whills.
Public Version of Fourth Draft. Dated: “Revised Fourth Draft, January 15, 1976.” A weird mixture of the Revised Fourth Draft and the actual film. Edited to fit the finished film, yet includes cut footage. No scene numbers.
Printed in The Art of Star Wars, Ballantine Books 1979. Edited by Carol Titelman. SW.CS.

1995.
Star Wars. Episode IV: A New Hope.
Continuity Script. “The script from each film as it appeared in the final version of the film itself.” Complete with time code on each page. No scene numbers.
Printed in Star Wars Trilogy. The Complete Scripts, Boxtree Ltd. 1995.

SW.SE. 1997.
Star Wars. Episode IV: A New Hope (Special Edition).
Public Version of Fourth Draft with Special Edition changes. No scene numbers. No dates. Annotated by Laurent Bouzereau, including interview snippets from George Lucas etc. Asterisks (*) indicate the most significant dialogue contributions from Willard Huyck and Gloria Katz for the revised Fourth Draft. Printed in Laurent Bouzereau, Star Wars: The Annotated Screenplays, Del Rey 1997.

SW.SF. 1998.
Star Wars. Episode IV: A New Hope.
Script Facsimile Edition of Fourth Draft with Special Edition changes. No scene numbers. No dates. A silly re-edition of the weird Public Version – how this can be called “facsimile” is beyond anyone’s guess.
Printed in Star Wars: Script Facsimile, Del Rey 1998.

The Scripts for THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK by Leigh Brackett, George Lucas & Lawrence Kasdan

A George Lucas quote from Denise Worrell’s book Icons (1989): “There are four or five scripts for Star Wars, and you can see as you flip through them where certain ideas germinated and how the story developed. There was never a script completed that had the entire story as it exists now. But by the time I finished the first Star Wars, the basic ideas and plots for Empire and Jedi were also done. As the stories unfolded, I would take certain ideas and save them; I’d put them aside in notebooks. As I was writing Star Wars, I kept taking out all the good parts, and I just kept telling myself I would make other movies someday. It was a mind trip I laid on myself to get me through the script. I just kept taking out stuff, and finally with Star Wars I felt I had one little incident that introduced the characters. So for the last six years [1977-1983] I’ve been trying to get rid of all the ideas I generated and felt so bad about throwing out in the first place.”

Before the incredible success of Star Wars at the box office, George Lucas actually contemplated a low-budget sequel, starring Mark Hamill and Carrie Fisher (Harrison Ford had not signed on for any sequels). The story evolved around Luke and Leia crash landing on a jungle planet, looking for the Kiber Crystal. Lucas gave the story to Alan Dean Foster to write it as a screenplay. Before Foster began, all box office records were broken, enabling Lucas to go on with his more ambitious saga. Thus, Alan Dean Foster was granted to use the discarded story idea for a novel: Splinters of the Mind’s Eye (1978).

TESB.0.
November 28, 1977.
The Empire Strikes Back.
Original Story Treatment by George Lucas. Handwritten original notes. Also a typed version with the same date.
Source: Bouzereau: p. 123.

TESB.SC.1.
November 28-December 2, 1977.
Chapter II, The Empire Strikes Back.
Story Conference between George Lucas and Leigh Brackett. Lucas also handed over his Story Treatment and other notes to Brackett. A transcript of the story conference was made.
Sources: Bouzereau: p. 123; Pollock: p. 226, 319.
A George Lucas quote from Star Wars: The Annotated Screenplays, 1997, p.144: “Writing has never been something I have enjoyed, and so, ultimately, on the second film I hired Leigh Brackett. Unfortunately, it didn’t work out; she turned in the first draft, and then she passed away. I didn’t like the first script, but I gave Leigh credit because I liked her a lot. She was sick at the time she wrote the script, and she really tried her best. During the story conferences I had with Leigh, my thoughts weren’t fully formed and I felt that her script went in a completely different direction.”

TESB.1.
February 23, 1978.
Star Wars Sequel, from the Adventures of Luke Skywalker by George Lucas.
First Draft by Leigh Brackett.
Sources: Bouzereau: p. 123; Pollock: p. 226.
A Lawrence Kasdan quote from Starlog #51 (October 1981): “I only skimmed it [Leigh Brackett's first draft]. It was sort of old fashioned and didn’t relate to Star Wars. The characters all had the right names, but her story’s spirit was different. […] I’m sure that had Leigh lived, she could have made the changes that George wanted in an excellent way.”
A Gary Kurtz quote from Cinefantastique Vol. 28, No.8 (February 1997): “Leigh had just barely finished her first draft [when she died], up to the two last pages. The pages weren’t even typed, but they were done.”

TESB.2.
April 1978.
The Empire Strikes Back.
Second Draft by George Lucas. Handwritten and typed versions.
Sources: Bouzereau: p. 123; Pollock: p. 226.
A George Lucas quote from Alan Arnold’s book Once Upon A Galaxy, 1980, p.177: “I hired Leigh Brackett to write the screenplay, but tragically she died right after completing the first draft. Faced with the situation that somebody had to step in and do a rewrite, I was forced to write the second draft of this screenplay. But I found it much easier than I’d expected, almost enjoyable. It still took me three months to do, but that’s a lot different from two years. I also had the advantage of Larry Kasdan coming in later to do a rewrite and fix it up.”

TESB.2.R.
April 1978.
The Empire Strikes Back.
Revised Second Draft by George Lucas. With Lucas’s handwritten notes. Also a typed copy.
Source: Bouzereau: p. 123.

TESB.3.
April 1978.
The Empire Strikes Back.
Third Draft by George Lucas. Handwritten notes.
Source: Bouzereau: p. 123.
August 1978.
Lucas meets with Lawrence Kasdan, who has just finished the script for Raiders of the Lost Ark.
Source: Pollock: p. 227.

TESB.4.
October 24, 1978.
The Empire Strikes Back.
Fourth Draft by Lawrence Kasdan. Shooting Script.
Source: Bouzereau: p. 123.
A Lawrence Kasdan quote from Starlog # 51 (October 1981): “[When he accepted the Empire assignment, Kasdan was handed a second draft script to work from that George Lucas had written.] George’s draft was something that he wrote very quickly, when Leigh passed away. George had the story very well outlined […]”

A Lawrence Kasdan quote from Cinefantastique Vol. 28, No.28 (February 1997): “What I worked on was a draft of the script George had written, based on the story George had given to Leigh [Brackett]. I don’t know what of Leigh’s draft survived into the draft George wrote. What George handed me was a very rough first draft, really somewhere between an outline and a first draft. The structure of the story was all there – it was the skeleton for a movie. What was needed was the flesh and the muscle.”

November 1978.
Script Conference for two weeks between George Lucas, Lawrence Kasdan, Irvin Kershner & Gary Kurtz. (Apparently, no transcript exists since Bouzereau does not mention this conference.)
Source: Pollock: p. 229.

TESB.4.R.
December 5, 1978-January 1 & 4, 1979.
The Empire Strikes Back.
Revised Fourth Draft by Lawrence Kasdan. 163 pages. 435 scenes. Shooting script.
February 19, 1979
Correspondence from Irvin Kershner to George Lucas, regarding revisions to pages 143-160.
Source: Bouzereau: p. 123.

TESB.5.
February 20, 1979.
The Empire Strikes Back.
Fifth Draft by Lawrence Kasdan. Shooting Script.

TESB.5.R.
March 19, July 23, August 24 1979.
The Empire Strikes Back.
Revised Fifth Draft by Lawrence Kasdan. 157 pages. 435 scenes. Shooting Script.
All through 1979-1980.
Subsequent revisions from director Irvin Kershner and actors. Many of these dialogue changes were not to the liking of screenwriter Lawrence Kasdan.

Published Scripts:

TESB.PV.
November 1980.
The Empire Strikes Back.
Public Version of Revised Fifth Draft. No dates. No scene numbers. Edited to fit the finished film.
Printed in The Empire Strikes Back Notebook, Ballantine Books 1980. Edited by Diana Attias & Lindsay Smith.

TESB.CS.
1995.
Star Wars. Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back.
Continuity Script. “The script from each film as it appeared in the final version of the film itself.” Complete with time code on each page. No scene numbers.
Printed in Star Wars Trilogy. The Complete Scripts, Boxtree Ltd. 1995.

TESB.SE.
1997.
Star Wars. Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back (Special Edition).
Public Version of Revised Fifth Draft with Special Edition changes. No scene numbers. Annotated by Laurent Bouzereau, including interview snippets from George Lucas etc.
Printed in Laurent Bouzereau, Star Wars: The Annotated Screenplays, Del Rey 1997.

SW.SF.
1998.
Star Wars. Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back.
Script Facsimile Edition of Fourth Draft with Special Edition changes. No scene numbers. No dates. A silly re-edition of the Public Version – how this can be called “facsimile” is beyond anyone’s guess.
Printed in The Empire Strikes Back: Script Facsimile, Del Rey 1998.

The Scripts for RETURN OF THE JEDI by George Lucas & Lawrence Kasdan

ROTJ.1.
February 20, 1981.
Star Wars, Episode VI: Revenge of the Jedi.
First Draft by George Lucas. Handwritten.
Source: Bouzereau: p. 231; Peecher: p. 2.
A George Lucas quote from Starlog #48 (July 1981): “I think that Revenge, for better or worse, is going to put the whole thing in perspective. I don’t know whether people are going to like it that much, but the truth of it is, that’s the way the film was originally designed. I think people have perceived [Star Wars] sort of different from the way it really is, and in this one it becomes obvious – which, essentially, is a fairy tale.”

ROTJ.1.R
February 24, 1981.
Star Wars, Episode VI: Revenge of the Jedi.
Rough Draft by George Lucas. With handwritten notes of the same date.
Source: Bouzereau: p. 231.

ROTJ.1.R.
June 12, 1981.
Star Wars, Episode VI: Revenge of the Jedi.
Revised Rough Draft with original notes by George Lucas. Also typed version.
Source: Bouzereau: p.231; Peecher: p.2.

July 13-July 17 1981.
Revenge of the Jedi.
Story Conference between George Lucas, Howard Kazanjian, Lawrence Kasdan & Richard Marquand in San Francisco.
Source: Bouzereau: p. 231; Peecher: p. 4.

ROTJ.2.
September 21, 1981.
Star Wars, Episode VI: Revenge of the Jedi.
Second Draft by Lawrence Kasdan, story by George Lucas.
Source: Bouzereau: p. 231.
A Lawrence Kasdan quote from Starlog #51 (October 1981): “[Kasdan is working from a] very rough first draft [script that George Lucas wrote. Kasdan will have to write Revenge of the Jedi quickly, since it begins shooting in January.] It’s a similar situation to the terrible time problem we had on Empire, but I think that this time I’ll have a much freer hand, because the Jedi screenplay that George gave me isn’t nearly as far along as Empire’s was.”

A Robert Watts quote from Peecher, p.7: “The screenplay is the blueprint for everything, and without it you tend to flounder a bit. We’d had indications, we’d had discussions, we’d had drafts, but the final script did come very, very late.”

ROTJ.2.R.
November 1, 1981.
Star Wars, Episode VI: Return of the Jedi.
Revised Second Draft by Lawrence Kasdan and George Lucas. Including handwritten notes.
Source: Bouzereau: p. 231.

ROTJ.2.R2.
November 11, 1981.
Star Wars, Episode VI: Return of the Jedi.
Revised Second Draft by Lawrence Kasdan and George Lucas, story by George Lucas.
Source: Bouzereau: p. 231.

ROTJ.3.
December 1, 1981. (Planned date: September 14, 1981.)
Star Wars, Episode VI: Return of the Jedi.
Third Draft by Lawrence Kasdan and George Lucas, story by George Lucas. 102 pages, 138 scenes.
Source: Bouzereau: p. 232; Peecher: p. 2, 24.

December 15, 1981.
Miscellaneous notes from Lawrence Kasdan on Wookiee Doodle Pad. (Regarding Han Solo.)
Source: Bouzereau: p. 232.

ROTJ.3.R
December 19, 1981
Star Wars, Episode VI: Return of the Jedi.
Third Draft with Revisions by Lawrence Kasdan. 102 pages, 138 scenes. (Sandstorm scene, longer Dagobah scene, Lando’s death)
Source: Peecher: p. 2.

ROTJ.3.R
January 4, 1982
Star Wars, Episode VI: Return of the Jedi.
Third Draft, revised by George Lucas.
Source: Bouzereau: p. 232.

January 12, 1982
According to Peecher (p.59): “After a night of reflection on the first day of filming and an 8 a.m. look at the previous day’s rushes […], George Lucas apparently decided that a few sections of the screenplay still needed some changes.”

The following odd telex was sent from Pat Carr to Jane Bay and Lata Ryan in California: “I have spoken to George and the following has been decided as the sequence of colors for script revisions: Original white will go into yellow. Yellow will become green if rewritten. Pink will become green if rewritten. As you know blue is for special use.” No wonder the script is muddled??

January 27, 1983
George Lucas officially changes the name to Return of the Jedi.

Published Scripts:

ROTJ.PV
November 1983.
Return of the Jedi.
Public Version of Revised Third Draft. No dates. No scene numbers. Edited to fit the finished film.
Printed in The Art of Return of the Jedi, Ballantine Books, 1983. Edited by Lucasfilm’s publishing department/Anita Gross.

ROTJ.CS.
1995.
Star Wars. Episode VI: Return of the Jedi.
Continuity Script. “The script from each film as it appeared in the final version of the film itself.” Complete with time code on each page.
Printed in Star Wars Trilogy. The Complete Scripts, Boxtree Ltd. 1995.

ROTJ.SE.
1997.
Star Wars. Episode VI: Return of the Jedi (Special Edition).
Public Version of Revised Third Draft with Special Edition changes. No scene numbers. Annotated by Laurent Bouzereau, including interview snippets from George Lucas etc.
Printed in Laurent Bouzereau, Star Wars: The Annotated Screenplays, Del Rey 1997.

SW.SF.
1998.
Star Wars. Episode VI: Return of the Jedi.
Script Facsimile Edition of Fourth Draft with Special Edition changes. No scene numbers. No dates. A silly re-edition of the Public Version – how this can be called “facsimile” is beyond anyone’s guess.
Printed in Return of the Jedi: Script Facsimile, Del Rey 1998.

Secondary Sources:

Laurent Bouzerau
Star Wars: The Annotated Screenplays, Del Rey 1997.

John L. Flynn
“Fall of the Republic” (fiction), Galactic Archives, Summer 1983.

“Star Wars: The Genesis”, Not of This Earth: Special Edition 1994, pp.4-15.

“Star Wars: Looking Back to the Future”, Not of This Earth: Special Edition 1994, pp.30-36.

“The Rise and Fall of Anakin Skywalker”, Cinescape, Vol. 1, No. 6 (March 1995), pp. 24-30. (Reprinted in abridged form in Cinescape Insider: Star Wars Special Report, 1996, pp.78-81.)

Garry Jenkins
Empire Building. The Remarkable Real Life Story of Star Wars, Simon & Schuster 1997.

Randy & Jean-Marc Lofficier
“La genese de Star Wars”, L’Ecran Fantastique, No. 33 (April 1983): pp. 16-20.”Star Wars Genesis”, Voyager, No. 4 (Summer 1983), pp.11-13.

“The Primordial Star Wars”, Starlog # 120 (July 1987), pp. 17-20.

John Phillip Peecher
The Making of Return of the Jedi, Del Rey 1983.

Dale Pollock
Skywalking. The Life and Films of George Lucas, Harmony Books 1983.

Denise Worrell
“The Dark Side of George Lucas”, author’s Icons. Intimate Portraits, Atlantic Monthly Press 1989, pp. 172-195.

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3 Responses to “The Connoisseur’s Guide to the Scripts of the Star Wars Saga”

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  1. Comment by Robert Cruz — June 13, 2011 at 1:56 pm  

    I found a script in my garage that is titled “The Star wars” First Draft 1974. Do you have any background on it?

  2. Comment by Lisa lampasano — December 25, 2011 at 5:45 pm  

    I have Twentieth century fox empire strikes back typed production info and interviews of main cast & directors as well as crew members says written by Alan Arnold .can u help me authenticate them

  3. Comment by 58 Facts You Probably Didn't Know About The Star Wars Movies | Sharing Interesting Stuff, Updates News & Free TipsMay 7, 2014 at 2:34 pm  

    [...] An early draft of the Star Wars saga began with “This is the story of Mace Windu, a revered Jedi-bendu of Opuchi who was related to Usby C.J. Thape, a padawan learner of the famed [...]

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